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Best Ring Slings of 2024
January 11, 2024

Best Ring Slings of 2024

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Best Ring Slings of 2024.
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Looking for a baby wrap without all of the...wrapping? It's time for you to consider one of the best ring slings for babies, according to the Babylist experts.Best Ring Slings of 2024

A ring sling is a convenient way to keep your little one close when they need to come along for the ride, whether you’re trying to get things done around the house or out running errands.

A ring sling can help calm a fussy little one down when they’re having a tough day or just need a little one-on-one time with someone they love. Slings also come in handy when baby needs you, but you need your hands free to do something else. They’re small and lightweight and easy to throw into your diaper bag or tote or stash in your car. And with a little practice, they can even be used for nursing on the go.

Babylist’s Top Picks for the Best Ring Slings

Babylist’s Picks for the Best Ring Slings

Best Ring Sling for Warm Weather

What Our Experts Say

WildBird ring slings are simple, beautiful heirloom-quality slings that are available in a beautiful range of colors and patterns. While you can wear them any time of year and in any climate, they’re especially great for warm weather. Made from 100% natural European linen that gets softer and softer with every use, the fabric really breathes, meaning that neither of you will mind being so close, even when the sun is shining.

What’s Worth Considering

This sling is available in two lengths: Standard (74 inches) and Long (90 inches), to fit all sizes of parents.

What Babylist Parents Say

“I use this with our son nonstop. We have the Solly and Ergobaby too, but this is the one I always throw in the diaper bag to have with me just in case. Comfortable and supportive for walking around, too! Watched all the tutorial videos on their website to get started and now it’s second nature, baby and I both love it.” -Jenna

Additional Specs
Weight guidelines 8-35 lbs
Carry positions Front inward, hip, back

Best Affordable Ring Sling

What Our Experts Say

From the makers of the beloved Moby Wrap comes a sling alternative made from a lightweight double gauze cotton. We love the breathability of the fabric and that it easily adjusts to fit all body types. This ring sling is available in five nature-inspired colorways.

What’s Worth Considering

Need a little help using your ring sling? Moby has a huge selection of video tutorials on YouTube.

What Babylist Parents Say

“More adaptable than any other carrier I’ve tried. The biggest selling point for me was the ability to breastfeed relatively easily and still have my hands free. It helped me get back to work quicker.” -KT

Additional Specs
Weight guidelines 8-33 lbs
Carry positions Front inward, hip

Best Luxury Ring Sling

What Our Experts Say

Made in California and crafted in small batches by local artisans, the family-run brand Sakura Bloom makes ring slings that are simple, soft and beautiful. These slings are an investment, but are truly heirloom-quality pieces that can be used through multiple children and passed on through generations. Fabric options include linen, waffle linen and luxurious silk.

What’s Worth Considering

Sakura Bloom has a whole section of their website dedicated to ring sling tutorials, including information on both wearing and caring for your sling.

Additional Specs
Weight guidelines 7-35 lbs
Carry positions Front inward, hip

Best Size-Inclusive Ring Sling

What Our Experts Say

Ring slings work for many different types of bodies, especially the (gorgeous) slings from Hope & Plum. These ultra soft slings are available in four different lengths, from short (74 inches) all the way to extra long (100 inches), so you’ll be able to find a good fit for any body size and type. They’re made from a hemp blend fabric and come in lots of beautiful and unique neutrals, prints and patterns.

What’s Worth Considering

Hope & Plum’s ring slings are crafted in the USA by a women-owned manufacturer. The brand also has a tutorials section on their website with tons of babywearing basics and how-to’s.

Additional Specs
Weight guidelines 8-35 lbs
Carry positions Front inward, hip

Best Ring Sling with Storage

What Our Experts Say

The Kyte Baby ring sling is made from pre-washed linen and features something everyone loves: pockets! There are two, a large exterior pocket and a smaller one on the inside of the sling. They’re perfect for toting along smaller items while you’re on the go with baby like your phone or a pacifier.

What’s Worth Considering

This sling comes in lots of beautiful colors. Parents also report that it arrives feeling broken in, which we like.

What Babylist Parents Say

“We’ve been using the Ergo for a while. Now I find the ring sling a lot easier to user. First of all, it’s less bulky to put in my diaper bag or under the stroller. Second, there is no belts or buckles! Once it’s threaded in, which you only need to do once, then you just pull the extra fabric to tighten. It’s super adjustable, which is needed, since baby grows and I shrink (hopefully), and I may wear a fluffy jacket on one day and not the other. The linen fabric on this one is super high quality. I love to play with the long tail too by styling it differently. The two pockets are very thoughtful. Exactly what a mom needs!” -Chloe H.

Additional Specs
Weight guidelines 8-35 lbs
Carry positions Front inward, hip

Best Patterned Ring Sling

What Our Experts Say

A ring sling can be just as much a style statement as an item of baby gear to make your life as a parent a little easier. If prints and patterns are your thing, check out Tula’s beautiful selection. These handmade slings come in lots of fun prints that are different from a lot of what else is out there. They’re made from a soft, woven fabric that gets softer with every use and come in a standard and long length.

What’s Worth Considering

You don’t need to be tall or plus-size to use a longer length ring sling. Some parents prefer the look of a longer tail or use the extra fabric length to drape back around baby when it gets chilly.

Additional Specs
Weight guidelines 8-35 lbs
Carry positions Front inward, hip

Most Comfortable Ring Sling

What Our Experts Say

The cotton Maya Wrap Lightly Padded Ring Sling has two benefits that really set it apart: padding and pockets. The padded fabric throughout the shoulder area adds a whole new level of comfort to babywearing (read: no painful digging in). And the pocket, sewn into the tail area of the sling, is genius—it’s big enough for your phone, a diaper and a pacifier. The Lightly Padded sling comes in two lengths, Standard (73 inches) and Long (85 inches).

What’s Worth Considering

The Lightly Padded Sling is Maya’s most beginner-friendly option. It’s designed to cup your shoulder and sit flat with no bunching, digging or shifting and is easy to slip on quickly for on-the-go babywearing. The brand also makes the ComfortFit Sling, which has a spandex inner panel to cushion your shoulder and keep the wrap in place. It also comes with a removable cloth band to adjust the shoulder width from wide to narrow.

Additional Specs
Weight guidelines 7-35 lbs
Carry positions Front inward, hip

Most Eco-Friendly Ring Sling

What Our Experts Say

Designed with comfort and sustainability in mind, Nalakai slings are made from vegan and eco-friendly fabrics and dyes. The lightweight linen and bamboo fabric blend does a great job of wicking away moisture and heat in the warmer months and keeping baby cozy when it gets chilly.

What’s Worth Considering

These slings are machine washable and can be tumble dried—just place the sling in a lingerie bag and use a gentle, cold cycle in the wash and a low heat in the dryer.

Additional Specs
Weight guidelines 8-35 lbs
Carry positions Front inward, hip

How We Chose Our Best Ring Slings

  • We analyzed results from Babylist’s Best Baby Products survey, which polled 6,000 Babylist users and asked them to share the baby products they love the most and why.
  • We utilized insight from the Babylist editorial team, including Gear Editor Jen LaBracio, an expert in the baby space for over six years and a mom of two who has written hundreds of baby gear guides and personally researched and tested hundreds of baby products, including many ring slings.
  • We reviewed customer reviews from hundreds of real Babylist parents.

What is a Ring Sling?

A ring sling is a type of baby carrier made from one long piece of fabric and two rings. The cloth is worked through the rings to create a secure pouch for your child to sit in—no snaps, buckles or ties needed. A ring sling is worn across your torso and supported by one shoulder. Ring slings usually work best with babies, but can accommodate toddlers as well.

A ring sling is one of many carrier options to choose from, including baby wraps, babywearing shirts and soft structured carriers. If you’re looking for something that provides the closeness of a wrap without actually having to do the wrapping, a ring sling is a great choice.

The downside? They’re a bit labor-intensive to keep clean. Most slings require either hand washing or machine washing on a gentle cycle with cold water. And using the dryer is a big no-no for many brands; lots of ring slings must be air-dried so they don’t shrink. They also can be a bit uncomfortable for long-term babywearing as they don’t distribute weight evenly.

Types of Ring Slings

Ring slings all share the same basic structure but do differ in material and shoulder types. Ring slings come in a wide array of fabrics like cotton, linen, silk, wool and even cashmere. Shoulder types differ between brands and include simple gathered (a shoulder sewn about five to eight inches from the rings), a floating gathered shoulder (sewn farther back than a simple gathered), pleated (narrow pleats near the rings) and even hybrid.

What’s the Difference Between a Ring Sling and a Baby Wrap?

Because they both use one huge swath of fabric, baby wraps and ring slings are similar, but there are a few key differences.

Baby wraps tend to be a bit more complex. They go over both shoulders and around your waist, distributing your little one’s weight a bit more evenly across your body than a ring sling. While this is great for making longer periods of babywearing more comfortable, the origami-like configurations can make wraps a bit tougher to get on and off.

Ring slings are best suited for shorter stints of babywearing. They’re far easier to get on and off than a baby wrap, which can be a big plus for some parents who need to use the sling multiple times a day. However, because all the weight rests on one shoulder, they aren’t as comfortable as baby wraps and aren’t recommended for long-term wear.

How to Use a Ring Sling

Every ring sling comes with its own set of specific instructions and size requirements, so always defer to those before using your sling. Keeping this in mind, these are some basic guidelines on how to use a ring sling.

  • Many ring slings come ready to use, but some need to be threaded. To thread your sling, push the fabric over the first ring and under the second to create a secure loop. (If you’re still unsure, check YouTube; there are lots of how-to videos available.)
  • Hold your sling in front of you with the rings in one hand and the fabric tail toward the shoulder your sling will rest on. Pass your other arm through the loop and over your head and position the rings just below your shoulder.
  • Spread the fabric wide across your back. Make sure it’s spread evenly and that there are not twists in the fabric.
  • Rest your baby on your opposite shoulder and guide them into the sling. Adjust the fabric around baby’s bottom by creating a seat that goes from knee to knee. (Tuck the bottom part of the sling between you and your baby to make this “deep” seat. It will help prevent the fabric from loosening when your baby straightens their legs.) Then spread the fabric up to the nape of their neck.
  • Tighten the sling slowly until your baby is secure. Be sure to pull the tail of the fabric across the top, middle and bottom so your baby is positioned snugly in the sling.

Once your baby is secured in the ring sling, use the T.I.C.K.S. acronym to check for a safe carry:

  • T. Tight
  • I. In view at all times
  • C. Close enough to kiss
  • K. Keep chin off chest
  • S. Supported back

And remember, all babywearing can be frustrating at first, so wait until your baby is calm the first few times your try your ring sling, and practice, practice, practice.


Jen LaBracio

Senior Gear Editor

Jen LaBracio is Babylist’s Senior Gear Editor, a role that perfectly combines her love of all things baby gear with her love of (obsessive) research. When she’s not testing out a new high chair or pushing the latest stroller model around her neighborhood, she likes to run, spin, listen to podcasts, read and spend time at the beach. In her past life, she worked for over a decade in children’s publishing. She lives outside of Chicago with her husband and their two boys, Will and Ben.

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