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Best Travel Strollers of 2024, Tested and Reviewed by Parents & Experts
Updated on
April 5, 2024

Best Travel Strollers of 2024, Tested and Reviewed by Parents & Experts

By Jen LaBracio | Medically Reviewed by Holly Peretz OT
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Best Travel Strollers of 2024, Tested and Reviewed by Parents & Experts.
Best Travel Strollers of 2024, Tested and Reviewed by Parents & Experts

If the thought of trying to wrangle your full-size stroller on your next family adventure feels daunting, it’s time to consider a travel stroller.

Travel strollers make leaving home with your little one a little bit easier and a lot more convenient. Today’s travel stroller is a minimalist’s dream. Most have many of the same high-end features as traditional strollers all rolled into a compact, portable package. Many travel strollers break down to fit in the overhead bin of a plane or can be folded down quickly (and with one hand—win) and slung over your shoulder. Many parents even use them as their day-to-day stroller.

If you’re a family who’s frequently on the go, a travel stroller may be the answer to help lighten your load and simplify your life. We’re sharing Babylist parents favorites and bestselling picks to help you narrow down your search. I also added my own thoughts and picks from the countless travel strollers I’ve tested over the last decade as a mom of two and in my role as Babylist’s Gear Editor.

Babylist’s Top Picks for the Best Travel Strollers

Babylist’s Picks for the Best Travel Strollers

Best Travel System Stroller

The Scoop
  • Baseless infant car seat, installs in seconds
  • Stroller has one-handed fold, weighs 13 pounds
  • Car seat weighs just 7 pounds
What Our Experts Say

If you know you’ll frequently be traveling while your baby is an infant, you may want to invest in a travel system (a stroller and car seat that attach to each other; here’s more on how to pick a travel system). This combo is the best of the best, and what I wish I’d had when I was a new mom living in New York City seven years ago and didn’t own a car. It combines the ultra-popular TRVL, the brand’s first dive into the lightweight stroller market, with the urbn, a first-of-its-kind car seat.

What’s so special about a baseless car seat? Most infant car seats can be installed without a base, but require a seat belt—along with time and patience. That’s not the case with the urbn. There’s no base to worry about AND the latch system is built right into the seat’s base. I was blown away by how quick and easy this seat was to install. I pressed a button on each side and pushed to attach it directly to my vehicle’s lower anchors—that’s it. It’s about as foolproof as it gets, and especially ideal if you’ll be using your car seat on the go in rideshares or taxis. This is also our pick for best travel car seat.

As for the TRVL stroller, it’s just as great. The two standout features for me were its fold (one-handed, quick and ridiculously easy) and its compact size (it stands on its own and weighs just over 13 pounds. While not huge, the basket is large enough to hold your essentials (and a little more) and is easy to access, and the TRVL’s maneuverability is good enough that you’ll be able to steer easily with one hand.

What’s Worth Considering

The TRVL is on the pricier side and it doesn’t have a carry strap, but the maneuverability, suspension and versatility help explain the higher price point. I found it worked as a travel stroller, but also as an everyday stroller, too. There are also lots of thoughtful design details like magnetic buckles, a no-rethread harness and leatherette bumper bar and handlebar. The urbn car seat has a lower height limit than many infant car seats—not ideal, but not a huge dealbreaker, either.

Additional Specs
Stroller Weight 13.6 lbs
Car Seat Weight 7 lbs
Stroller Folded Dimensions 24” x 20.25” x 11”
Child Guidelines Stroller: from 6 months up to 50 lbs; Car seat: 4-22 lbs, up to 29”

Best Travel Stroller for Toddlers

The Scoop
  • Four-wheel suspension for a smooth ride
  • Fast, easy fold
  • Included footrest and high seat back
What Our Experts Say

There are two travel strollers I recommend again and again to families, and Bugaboo’s newest compact stroller, the Butterfly, is one of them. (The other one is the Joolz Aer+—more on that below!). This style-forward stroller is packed with thoughtful, impressive features, just like the brand’s popular full-size strollers. Two of my favorites (and there are many to choose from!) are the smooth ride and the quick, easy fold. The four-wheel suspension system means the Butterfly rides more like a traditional stroller than a compact one, a huge perk when I pushed it on anything other than smooth pavement and perfect for toting around my larger toddler. It moves and turns easily and I was able to steer it with only one hand, a huge plus. The fold is just as impressive; I also did it one-handed, and the Butterfly folds down to about the side of a small bag. (There’s also a built-in carry strap, a feature I value in any stroller, but especially one designed for travel.)

A few other things I love: it accommodates an infant car seat with adapters, so you can use it from day one, and the seat has a high back for larger kiddos and reclines almost fully for napping on the go. There’s even a footrest built in for extra comfort, another toddler-friendly feature. (My 95th-percent-in-height two-year-old still fits perfectly in it.) And the sun canopy on the Butterfly is one of the best I’ve seen of all the travel strollers on our list.

What’s Worth Considering

There’s not much to pick on with this stroller, minus its high price tag. The back wheels on the Butterfly are fairly close together. That setup, combined with a handle that doesn’t extend (which is the norm for compact strollers), means that if you’re on the taller side like me (5’10”), you may kick the back of the stroller while you’re walking. And although I wouldn’t consider it heavy, it is one of the heavier travel strollers on our list by about three pounds.

Additional Specs
Stroller Weight 16.1 lbs
Folded Dimensions 17.72” x 9.06” x 21.26”
Age Range 6 mos up to 50 lbs; from birth with the use of an infant car seat (adapters sold separately)

Best Budget Travel Stroller

The Scoop
  • Great value
  • Extremely light—weighs less than 12 pounds
  • Easy fold but not as compact as others on our list
What Our Experts Say

If you’re not looking to spend a lot on a travel stroller or you’re a family who doesn’t travel very often, the Kolcraft Cloud Light is an excellent value for an inexpensive stroller. It boasts lots of thoughtful features, especially considering the stroller’s price. Weight is the standout here—the Cloud Plus weighs less than twelve pounds, making it one of the lightest strollers on our list. The fold is also worth a second look. Although it’s not super compact (the stroller folds in on itself, much like an umbrella stroller, rather than in a tri-fold like many other travel strollers on our list), it’s quick and easy and you can do it with one hand, a feature we always appreciate especially when we’re on the go.

Other features to note include an extendable canopy with a peekaboo window, a parent tray with two drink holders and a large storage basket (it’s one of the biggest on our list).

What’s Worth Considering

The seat on the Cloud Plus has multiple positions but doesn’t recline completely flat. It has a lower weight limit than many of the strollers on our list—40 pounds—and doesn’t have much in the way of suspension and shock absorption. The fold is slim but not all that compact.

And remember—this stroller is under $100. It’s not going to compare to travel strollers five times its price in suspension, maneuverability, stability or materials. But, considering the price, it’s a great option if you don’t travel all that much but want a lightweight stroller option when you do.

What Babylist Parents Say

“Easily fits in the trunk of my car.” -Cora

Additional Specs
Stroller Weight 11.8 lbs
Folded Dimensions 18” x 12” x 34”
Age Range From 6 months up to 40 lbs

Best Travel Stroller for Everyday Use

The Scoop
  • Great for travel + everyday use
  • Roomy storage basket
  • Shock-absorbing suspension for a smooth ride
What Our Experts Say

UPPAbaby was one of the first stroller brands to dive into the “travel stroller that can also be used as an everyday stroller” category, and the Minu does both of these things extremely well. From your own neighborhood to wherever your travel adventures take you and to everything in between, the Minu offers all the conveniences of a day-to-day stroller in a travel-friendly package. A few of my favorite features are the one-handed fold, the huge sunshade, the comfy seat with multi-position recline and a roomy, easy-access basket. The spring-action, shock-absorbing all-wheel suspension makes for a smooth ride even over bumpy terrain, so it’s a stroller you can use both in the suburbs and in a city. The Minu stands when folded and features a carry strap and a storage bag for easy transport.

What’s Worth Considering

As-is, the Minu works for babies three+ months; that means if you want to use it with your newborn, you’ll need to add the bassinet and adapters, which will cost you.

The Minu folds compactly but is a little bulkier than some of the other strollers on our list when it’s broken down. It’s also a little heavier, weighing in at about 17 pounds. And the seat back is on the shorter side.

What Babylist Parents Say

“Amazing stroller. Great for travelling (fits in overhead bin), shopping (takes up minimal trunk space), walks in the park (very smooth ride, even over grass!). Has oversized canopy to block sun and folds with one hand. Bought it for travel, but use it as our primary stroller because I love it so much.” -Jessica

Additional Specs
Stroller Weight 16.9 lbs
Folded Dimensions 11.5” x 20.5” x 23”
Age Range From 3 months up to 50 lbs

Best Travel Stroller for Flying

The Scoop
  • Fits in overhead bin
  • Fast, one-handed fold
  • Options to customize color, add a second rider and more
What Our Experts Say

The YOYO2 was ahead of its time in the world of compact strollers and remains a parent favorite both for travel and for families looking for a smaller, lighter everyday stroller option. This compact favorite fits in the overhead bin and is the stroller of choice for many light-packing parents who don’t want to deal with the hassle (or risk) of gate-checking a stroller when they fly. It performs like a champ off the plane, too, easily steering through crowds and through narrow spaces.

There’s one other unique thing to love here—the custom options. You can change out the seat and shade fabrics with a new color pack, add a custom footmuff for cooler temps, help your older kiddo hitch a ride on the stroller board and even add a storage bag that uses wheeled support so your stroller won’t tip. With adapters that are sold separately, you can also use this stroller with some of the best infant car seats from Nuna and Maxi Cosi, among others.

What’s Worth Considering

The YOYO2’s fold isn’t hard, but it’s not quite as easy as some of the other travel stroller picks on our list. (There are two steps, and it takes a little getting used to.) The canopy is on the shorter side. This travel stroller does come with a rain cover, but all the other extras and custom adds will cost you. (And this stroller is on the pricier side to begin with.)

What Babylist Parents Say

“Fits in airplane cabin. We took it on so many trips!” -Emily

Additional Specs
Stroller Weight 13.6 lbs
Folded Dimensions 20.5” x 17.3” x 7.1”
Age Range From 6 months up to 50 lbs

Best Compact Travel Stroller

The Scoop
  • Four-wheel suspension for a smooth ride
  • One-handed fold and compact carry
  • Comfy, contoured seat
What Our Experts Say

I’ve tried a LOT of travel strollers in my day, and the Joolz Aer+ is the one I come back to again and again. Pushing it doesn’t feel much different than pushing much larger, much more expensive strollers—and that’s one of the things I love about it. The Aer+ has four-wheel suspension, a feature that’s not very common in travel strollers, so it maneuvers easily and glides smoothly even across uneven surfaces like bumpy sidewalks and dirt paths. That combined with the ridiculously easy one-handed fold, the compact design and the comfortable seat that contours to fit your child’s body makes this stroller a great choice for travel and for everyday use. (It currently occupies a permanent spot in the trunk of my car.)

The Aer+ is newborn-friendly and compatible with Nuna and Clek car seats (adapters sold separately), so it works if you want to use it from day one. The stroller folds small enough to fit in an overhead bin or to sling over your shoulder (carry strap included) and tote up and down stairs, on public transportation or anywhere else you need to go. It also comes with a rain cover and travel bag included.

What’s Worth Considering

The Aer+ is on the pricier side, but if you’re planning on using it for travel and for everyday, then the cost doesn’t seem as daunting. I also wish it came with a footrest instead of having to purchase one separately.

What Babylist Parents Say

“It’s so easy to push and steer and SO easy to fold with just one hand. We use it as a travel stroller and often as our everyday stroller as well.” -Jennifer

Additional Specs
Stroller Weight 13.2 lbs
Folded Dimensions 21” x 17.7” x 8.5”
Age Range From 6 months up to 50 lbs

Best Lightweight Travel Stroller

The Scoop
  • One-handed fold
  • Fits in overhead bin
  • Extended canopy, full recline
What Our Experts Say

Lightweight, compact and travel-ready are the three features that come to mind when I think of The Traveler from Zoe. This aluminum-frame stroller is light enough for easy portability but durable enough to handle lots of different adventures. I love the one-handed fold and that it’s small enough to fit in an overhead bin if you don’t want to wrangle with gate checking your stroller on your next trip. There are lots of high-end features like an extended canopy, adjustable footrest and a near-flat recline. And don’t forget one of the best parts: The Traveler folds in seconds with one hand and stands on its own.

What’s Worth Considering

The Traveler isn’t compatible with any car seats so you won’t be able to use it with younger babies. There are also no straps or backpack included; if you want those, you’ll have to pay extra to add them on. And while it shines on smooth pavement, it’s not great on bumpy or uneven terrain.

Need a double travel stroller? Zoe’s The Twin+ is a great choice. It weighs under 20 pounds and fits through standard doorways but is comfortable and roomy enough for two children up to 45 pounds each. The fold is quick, easy and compact and the stroller is Disney-approved. And it can expand to a triple or a quad stroller with additional seats.

Additional Specs
Stroller Weight 13 lbs
Folded Dimensions 22” x 19” x 10”
Age Range From 3 months up to 45 lbs

Best Value Travel Stroller

The Scoop
  • Same one-handed fold Baby Jogger full-size strollers are known for
  • 3 ways to ride: infant car seat, bassinet or toddler seat
  • Padded seat with added depth
What Our Experts Say

Travel strollers can get expensive. If you don’t want to spend $500+ on one, but you travel frequently and want a reliable option, the City Tour 2 is a great mid-priced pick.

Baby Jogger strollers are known (and loved) for their easy, one-handed fold—and this travel stroller is no exception. The City Tour 2 folds into a 19-by-23-inch rectangle and automatically locks closed. You can carry it by the handle or tuck it away in the included tote bag carryall while your little one explores. The stroller has a deep, padded seat and adjustable calf support to keep your kiddo comfortable. Plus, a huge UV 50+ sun canopy provides shade.

What’s Worth Considering

There’s suspension system in the frame isn’t great, making for a bit of a bumpy ride. Some parents wish the tote bag carryall had backpack straps for easier transport rather than a shoulder strap.

What Babylist Parents Say

“I love that I can carry, open and fold it with one hand. It’s easy to maneuver and the only stroller I own. Perfect for city living!” -Amie

Additional Specs
Stroller Weight 14 lbs
Folded Dimensions 19” x 7” x 23”
Age Range From 6 months up to 45 lbs

Best Infant Travel Stroller

The Scoop
  • Comes with universal car seat adapter
  • Full recline seat
  • Ventilated backrest for airflow
What Our Experts Say

The Mountain Buggy Nano stroller is the best of both worlds—a travel stroller that can also act as a travel system. Unlike most travel strollers, this one comes equipped with a universal car seat adapter so you can pop in your infant seat and be on your way with your newborn in tow. (You can also purchase the Cocoon Carrycot separately if you prefer a bassinet option.)

The Nano is lightweight and compact enough to fit easily into many carry-on luggage units on planes and trains or in a trunk, and the travel bag has a handle and strap for portability. The narrow width and front-wheel swivel makes it good for use on city streets or other tight spaces and the seat features a full recline perfect for naps.

What’s Worth Considering

There’s no suspension system and no peekaboo window. You need to use two hands to fold the Nano. (Although it’s still really easy.)

What Babylist Parents Say

“It folded up so small that it fit on the plane as a carryon but it also handled really well on european cobblestone” -Nikki

Additional Specs
Stroller Weight 13 lbs
Folded Dimensions 20” x 12” x 22”
Age Range From birth up to 44 lbs

Best Umbrella Stroller for Travel

The Scoop
  • Great value
  • Easy to maneuver
  • Umbrella-style fold is bulky
What Our Experts Say

Umbrella strollers used to be the norm in the compact stroller category. That’s changed over the last five years or so, but if you still prefer one for travel, the Summer 3D Lite should be on your list.

The 3D Lite is a great all-around travel stroller. It’s light (about 13 pounds), features a simple, compact fold and a built-in carry strap, has a seat that lays nearly flat and boasts an ample storage basket. The ride isn’t super cushy, but it’s not all that bumpy, either. And at well under $100, it’s an incredible value for a stroller with this many great features.

What’s Worth Considering

Since this is an umbrella stroller, you won’t find the compact tri-fold that parents love so much about many travel strollers.

What Babylist Parents Say

“It is so easy to travel with - we used it on a cruise ship, in various airports, and for all our daily errands.” -Jeanine

Additional Specs
Stroller Weight 13 lbs
Folded Dimensions 10” x 12” x 43”
Age Range From 6 months up to 50 lbs

Also Worth a Look…

The world of compact travel strollers has exploded recently, flooding the market with lots of options. Here are a few other travel strollers worth a look:

  • The Bumprider Connect 3 Stroller ($599.99) is totally unique. It features a magnetic lock system that allows you to join two or more strollers together. It’s pricey, though, especially if you need more than one.
  • Evenflo Gold’s Otto ($199.99) is a competitively priced self-folding, lightweight stroller with a high weight limit (55 pounds) and a two-position adjustable footrest.
  • The Inglesina Quid ($299.00) fits in an overhead bin and offers thoughtful features like a self-standing fold, an extendable canopy and a large flap on the hood that fully retracts for ventilation on warm days. The Quid weighs in at only 13 pounds.

How We Chose the Best Travel Strollers

  • We analyzed results from Babylist’s Best Baby Products survey, which polled 6,000 Babylist users and asked them to share the baby products they love the most and why.
  • We utilized insight from the Babylist editorial team, including Gear Editor Jen LaBracio, an expert in the baby space for over six years and a mom of two who has written hundreds of baby gear guides and personally researched and tested hundreds of baby products, including many travel strollers.
  • We reviewed customer reviews from hundreds of real Babylist parents.

Which Stroller Is Best for Travel?

Some families use a traditional stroller for everything, even traveling. But having a lighter, more nimble travel stroller pays off when you really need it: for airports, narrow city sidewalks, public transportation or just to lighten the load.

Here are some of the pros and cons of using different types of strollers for travel:

  • Traditional stroller: Everyday strollers typically have convenient features like lots of storage space, cup holders and trays, and large canopies. Some may also have all-terrain wheels and accommodate an infant car seat. But they’re heavier and bulkier to fold, which makes using and storing them in tight spaces more difficult (think: narrow doorways, airplane overhead bins, small car trunks).
  • Umbrella stroller: Bare-boned and exceptionally lightweight, umbrella strollers often lack many amenities you find in traditional strollers like adjustable seats and cup holders. They have skimpy canopies, minimal cushioning and seat support and don’t fold small enough to fit in airport storage bins. You also can’t push an umbrella stroller with one hand. Umbrella strollers are good for when you occasionally need a slimmer, fast-fold stroller.
  • Travel stroller: Sometimes also called a lightweight stroller, travel strollers strike a balance between traditional and umbrella stroller styles. They’re lighter than the standard stroller, easy to fold and compact in size when collapsed. (Some travel strollers fold in half, called a square fold, while others feature a more compact tri-fold.) Travel strollers have some full-size amenities like large sun canopies and a storage basket and most even have extras like cup holders.

Figuring out the best stroller to use for travel often comes down to what type of trade-offs you want to make around budget, space and personal preference.

  • Some traditional strollers offer a compact fold that’s great for travel, but the stroller weighs a ton.
  • Umbrella strollers tend to be affordable but require two hands for pushing and only offer a vertical fold.
  • Compact travel strollers are light, portable and easy to steer but come at a cost.

Before you invest in a travel stroller, think through:

  • How often you travel
  • How much money you want to spend
  • Where you’ll be storing your stroller when it’s not in use

Also note that lots of parents find that a travel stroller can work just as well as a full-size option for everyday use; just keep in mind that unless the travel stroller you choose is compatible with an infant car seat or comes with a separate infant kit, you’ll need to wait to use the stroller until your baby is six months old and can sit up unassisted.  

What to Look for in a Travel Stroller

A travel stroller should be easy to take with you on trips and be a comfy spot for your little one, especially since your child will probably spend more hours in it while traveling than at home. Consider these features as you research and shop:

  • Size and weight. You’re going to be lifting, carrying and storing your travel stroller often, so the stroller’s size and weight is important. Look for one that’s lightweight and manageable. Also pay attention both to the folded and unfolded size of your travel stroller. Hoping to If you’re planning on using it for an older toddler, also be sure it’s large enough to accommodate them.
  • Fold. There’s also a lot of folding and unfolding a stroller during travel, whether it’s to take it in and out of your car, stash it under a table at a restaurant or storing it in the overhead compartment of an airplane. Choose a travel stroller with a quick, easy fold, preferably one you can do one-handed.
  • Maneuverability. Not all travel strollers are created equally. Some offer much more maneuverability and a better suspension system than others; however, these features often come at a cost. Thinking through how often you’ll be using your travel stroller and what types of terrain you’ll encounter most often can be helpful in determining whether or not a more expensive stroller is worthwhile.
  • Canopy size. Most travel involves at least some, if not a lot, of outdoor time. A large canopy is essential for protecting your little one from the elements, especially the sun.
  • Comfort and convenience features. Similar to a full-size stroller, look for features that will make you and your little one more comfortable, especially while traveling. Things like an adjustable seat with a full or nearly full recline, an ample storage basket, an adjustable handlebar and easy to clean fabrics are all important. And don’t forget a built-in strap or a separate carrying case for easy transport.

How Do You Travel with a Stroller on a Plane?

Bringing a stroller with you on trips can seem daunting. How do you get it from point A to point B when you’re flying? Will it count toward your carry-on and baggage allotment? And what if you need to use your stroller in the airport? Good news: You can pick how you want to travel with your stroller, depending on your needs. Here are the choices:

  • Check the stroller with your baggage: Some parents unload the stroller during check-in and switch to using a baby carrier through the airport instead. Pair a front carrier with a backpack-style diaper bag so your hands will be free to deal with other things (like the toys that will make your trip a breeze). Note that if you have a large stroller, you may be required to check it as baggage anyway. This usually doesn’t count toward your baggage allotment.
  • Check the stroller at the gate: Want to use the stroller until you board the plane? You can check the stroller with the gate agent—it just needs to be tagged—and then pick it up outside the aircraft door when you arrive. (Just remember if you have a connecting flight to catch, waiting for your stroller to be placed on the jet bridge can eat up precious time.)
  • Stow the stroller on the airplane: Some travel strollers fold up so small they fit in a backpack and can be stored in an overhead bin. Having your stroller with you eliminates the hassle of waiting for it on the jet bridge or at baggage claim (or losing it).

Some other air-travel tips to keep in mind:

  • If you check the stroller with baggage, you do run the risk of damage. If you’re not using a travel stroller bag, ask the agent at check-in for a plastic bag to cover and protect it during transport.
  • If you’re taking the stroller through security, it will need to be folded and put through the X-ray machine. Don’t stuff the undercarriage basket until after security.
  • If your checked stroller doesn’t come out with the suitcases at baggage claim, check the oversized luggage area. It may have been set aside there (this may also be where your travel crib is, if you checked one).

Do you need a travel stroller bag?

How you plan to use your travel stroller will affect whether or not you need a travel stroller bag.

If you plan on flying with your stroller then you’ll probably want to use a travel stroller bag, especially if you don’t plan on stowing your stroller in the overhead compartment of the plane (either because you don’t want to or because it won’t fit). A checked stroller, even one that’s gate checked, may get tossed around quite a bit while in transit, so you’ll want a travel stroller bag to keep it protected.

If you’re not planning on flying much with your stroller or if you’re simply using your travel stroller as a more lightweight day-to-day option, then a travel stroller probably isn’t a must-have.

Some travel strollers come with a travel bag while others require you to purchase one separately, so check with your particular brand. There are generic travel stroller bags that may work, too.


Jen LaBracio

Senior Gear Editor

Jen LaBracio is Babylist’s Senior Gear Editor, a role that perfectly combines her love of all things baby gear with her love of (obsessive) research. When she’s not testing out a new high chair or pushing the latest stroller model around her neighborhood, she likes to run, spin, listen to podcasts, read and spend time at the beach. In her past life, she worked for over a decade in children’s publishing. She lives outside of Chicago with her husband and their two boys, Will and Ben.

This information is provided for educational and entertainment purposes only. We do not accept any responsibility for any liability, loss or risk, personal or otherwise, incurred as a consequence, directly or indirectly, from any information or advice contained here. Babylist may earn compensation from affiliate links in this content. Learn more about how we write Babylist content and review products, as well as the Babylist Health Advisory Board.