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Updated on
June 9, 2023

32 Weeks Pregnant

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32 Weeks Pregnant.
32 Weeks Pregnant

At 32 weeks pregnant, you may be starting to nest, setting up baby’s nursery and getting your home ready for a new occupant. Baby is also starting to get ready for life on the outside, practicing skills like sucking, swallowing and breathing. You’re probably feeling their every move too—those kicks are surprisingly strong! Here’s what else to know about week 32 of pregnancy.

How Many Months Is 32 Weeks Pregnant?

32 weeks pregnant in months is eight months pregnant, which is part of the third trimester of pregnancy.

How Big Is Your Baby at 32 Weeks?

At 32 weeks, your baby is about 16.7 inches long and weighs around 3.8 pounds. That’s about the size of a Care Bear.

Your Baby’s Development at 32 Weeks

With only two months left to go, your baby is finalizing everything they need for life outside the womb. Here’s what’s happening with baby at 32 weeks:

  • Sucking and swallowing: When you’re 32 weeks pregnant, your baby is practicing sucking and swallowing to prepare their digestive system for drinking milk.
  • Breathing: They’re also practicing breathing by inhaling amniotic fluid.
  • Strong kicks: Is someone knocking down the door from the inside? Keep counting those kicks and log how many minutes it takes your baby to get to ten movements. Call your doctor if it’s longer than two hours, or if you notice a change in how often your baby is moving in general.
Pregnant with Twins?

We probably don’t have to tell you this, but if you’re 32 weeks pregnant with twins, you’re truly in the home stretch. Many twins are born around week 37 of pregnancy.

💛 Congratulations 💛

You are 80% through your pregnancy!

32 Weeks Pregnant Ultrasound

Pregnancy-Ultrasound-week-32

32 Weeks Pregnant Ultrasound

If you have an ultrasound at 32 weeks pregnant, there are two main things your provider will look at: baby’s positioning and baby’s movement. The ideal position for baby is head down, face down, but if they haven’t found their way there yet, there’s still time for them to get there. Your doctor will also want to confirm that baby is active and moving around enough.

32 Weeks Baby Movement

At around 28 weeks pregnant, you’ll want to start counting baby’s kicks. You can do this while sitting or lying quietly, or at some point during your day. “You’ll want to be able to feel ten distinct movements—rolls, kicks or flutters—within a two-hour period,” Dr. Jennifer Lang, a Los Angeles–based ob-gyn and author of The Whole 9 Months: A Week-by-Week Pregnancy Nutrition Guide with Recipes for a Healthy Start, tells Babylist. “Most of the time, you’ll get there in the first five minutes,” although it can take up to two hours. You’ll want to feel those ten kicks in that time frame, and if you don’t, wait a few hours, have something to eat and try again. If you don’t feel baby move within two two-hour periods, or if you notice a big change in the amount baby is moving, give your doctor a call.

Your Body at 32 Weeks of Pregnancy

By 32 weeks pregnant, you’re probably continuing to gain around a pound per week. About half of that weight goes straight to your growing baby (who’s almost 17 inches by now!), and the other half is mostly fluids and blood. Think about it this way: your blood volume has increased by 40-50% since the beginning of your pregnancy.

Shortness of breath

At the 32nd week of pregnancy, your uterus is about five inches above your belly button, which means your lungs are getting crowded. So don’t be surprised if you have trouble catching your breath. Rest assured your baby’s getting plenty of oxygen, but you’ll probably need to take more frequent breaks and not push yourself as hard as you’re used to.

Heartburn

The third trimester is notorious for being plagued by heartburn. Keep watching what foods and practices may cause yours to flare up—eating before bed or noshing on spicy foods, for example. And take an over-the-counter antacid when your precautions don’t seem to work—just make sure you’ve gotten the OK from your healthcare provider.

Urge to nest

The nesting instinct is so real! Dogs, mice, cats, humans—even honey bees—are all driven to create a safe, welcoming place for our young at the end of pregnancy. Your nesting instincts may take the form of working on your baby registry, picking out nursery colors or even giving in to your urge to scrub the floorboards.

Weird dreams

Pregnancy hormones—plus trouble sleeping, stress and anticipation for baby’s arrival—can cause some pretty wacky dreams. Consider keeping a dream journal, so you can look back and your wild night time visions. You may even want to share them with your future child when they’re older.

Signs of labor?

If you start to experience any signs of preterm labor at 32 weeks, like consistent contractions, bleeding or a sudden change in vaginal discharge, be sure to let your doctor know and head to labor & delivery right away, just to be on the safe side.

Fun Fact

Your breast milk changes based on whether you have a boy or girl. One study suggests milk for boys may be richer and milk for girls may be higher in calcium.

Real Baby Bumps at 32 Weeks Pregnant

32 weeks pregnant belly @krystalmfesterly

32 weeks pregnant pictures reganseefuss

32 weeks pregnant baby size @jen ed

32 weeks pregnant belly size @sweetmamasharon

32 weeks pregnant belly pictures @chris tinexo

32 weeks pregnant baby position @mariapbj

32 weeks pregnant belly bump pictures @ meganmade

32 weeks pregnant bump pics @cheyanneloiseau

32 weeks pregnant belly @cassy16

Pregnancy Symptoms Coming up in Week 33

In week 33 of pregnancy, you and your baby will both be a little bit bigger. You might begin to feel extra toasty as your body temperature rises and Braxton Hicks contractions may become a part of your everyday life.

Commonly Asked Questions About 32 Weeks Pregnant

Is my baby in the right position?

Wondering what the most common 32 weeks pregnant baby position is? Most babies change position to being head-down, facing your back, by this week. It’s called the cephalic position and it’s the ideal position for vaginal birth. If baby is still head-up, there are still a few more weeks for them to flip into place. Your healthcare provider will track movement as the weeks pass and there’s plenty of time for serious baby gymnastics. In the meantime, if you’re curious about ways to improve fetal positioning, check out Spinning Babies. This go-to resource has all the info you need to safely and gently encourage your babe into the best position possible.

What does it mean for baby to “drop”?

You may still be carrying your baby high in your midsection, but soon they will “drop.” “Dropping, or lightening, is the time in pregnancy when the fetal head moves lower in the pelvis.” Says Dr. Rodney Wise, A Fellow of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and Market Chief Medical Officer at AmeriHealth Caritas. This happens for some pregnant people in the month or so before they deliver; for others, it happens during labor. When your baby drops, you’ll probably know it. You may breathe easier and heartburn may ease. Pressure in your lower abdomen is likely to increase though, “ Dropping may cause pelvic pain, hemorrhoids, back pain and hip discomfort,” says Dr. Wise. And with baby resting so low in your pelvis you may switch to a “waddle” when you walk (sorry) and need even more frequent bathroom breaks.

How do I know it’s Braxton Hicks contractions and not the real thing?

Braxton Hicks contractions aren’t painful or regular. “Real contractions are rhythmic,” Says Venus Standard, a certified nurse midwife and assistant professor at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. “Braxton Hicks can be sporadic and often don’t have a trackable timable pattern while real contractions get longer, stronger and closer together.” You might notice Braxton Hicks contractions when you’re dehydrated, after sex or when you need to pee. If the cramping doesn’t go away and/or if it continues to get more intense or frequent, you should contact your healthcare provider immediately. It could be a sign of preterm labor.

Recommended Products for 32 Weeks Pregnant

If you’re planning to try to breastfeed, you might want to get a book that you have on your nightstand to help you through the process. And if you’re thinking about baby sleep, it’s a good idea to stock up on swaddles that will help them rest well once they’re here. And from here on out, it’s important to rest up and take care of yourself. So don’t be shy about practicing self-care.

Nancy Mohrbacher 
Breastfeeding Made Simple

Buy Now

32 Weeks Pregnant Checklist

  • Go to your week 32 prenatal visit.
  • If you’re going to try to breastfeed, read that breastfeeding book to get ready and make sure your pumping attachments fit properly.
  • Go on a tour of the hospital’s labor and delivery ward to see what to expect.
  • Enjoy your baby shower, if you’re having one! It’s probably happening right around now.

Sources

  • Dr. Jennifer Lang
  • Dr. Rodney Wise, a fellow of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and Market Chief Medical Officer at AmeriHealth Caritas.
  • Venus Standard, a certified nurse midwife and assistant professor at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine

This information is provided for educational and entertainment purposes only. We do not accept any responsibility for any liability, loss or risk, personal or otherwise, incurred as a consequence, directly or indirectly, from any information or advice contained here. Babylist may earn compensation from affiliate links in this content. Learn more about how we write Babylist content and the Babylist Health Advisory Board.


Babylist Staff

Editor

Babylist editors and writers are parents themselves and have years of experience writing and researching, coming from media outlets like Motherly, the SF Chronicle, the New York Times and the Daily Beast, and the fields of early childhood education and publishing. We research and test hundreds of products, survey real Babylist parents and consult reviews in order to recommend the best products and gear for your growing family.

This information is provided for educational and entertainment purposes only. We do not accept any responsibility for any liability, loss or risk, personal or otherwise, incurred as a consequence, directly or indirectly, from any information or advice contained here. Babylist may earn compensation from affiliate links in this content. Learn more about how we write Babylist content and review products, as well as the Babylist Health Advisory Board.