14 Weeks Pregnant - Symptoms, Baby Development, Tips - Babylist

14 Weeks Pregnant

August 22, 2019

14 Weeks Pregnant

14 Weeks Pregnant
14 Weeks Pregnant

Here’s what to know when you’re 14 weeks pregnant:

Your Baby at 14 Weeks

Baby is growing and changing every day. Did you know baby can suck their thumb now? Here’s what else is going on with your baby at 14 weeks pregnant.

How Big is Your Baby at 14 Weeks?

A 14-week fetus is 3.4 inches long and weighs 1.52 ounces this week. That’s about the size of a Bagel Bite.

Your Baby’s Development

  • Peach fuzz: Newborns are born with lanugo. Sounds like a nice Italian seafood dish. But it’s actually a layer of thin, downy hair that covers their entire bodies. This week your baby is starting to grow lanugo, as well as some hair on their head.
  • Facial movements: When you’re 14 weeks pregnant, baby’s facial muscles are developing. They can frown and squint. Smiles will come later!
  • Working organs: The spleen and liver are now working, so they’re producing bile and red blood cells.

14 Weeks Pregnant Ultrasound

14 Weeks Pregnant Ultrasound

Photo by Tommy’s

Your Body: 14 Weeks Pregnant Symptoms

This is the stage of pregnancy you’ve been waiting for. The second trimester is famous for relief from fatigue and nausea, since hormones tend to level out, so you may be feeling hungry and more engergetic. Another thing to note: Now that you’re in second trimester, the risk of miscarriage drops dramatically. Here’s what else you may be feeling.

  • Morning sickness: Still feeling sick to your stomach? That’s normal too. The second trimester doesn’t always magically flip off the nausea switch. You may just need another week or two. If it keeps up, tell the doc, since it could be a severe form called hyperemesis gravidarum, which can be treated.
  • Round ligament pain: The round ligament extends from the front of your uterus into your groin. As the uterus moves up and expands to accommodate a growing baby, it stretches that ligament, which can cause sharp and sudden pain. Ouch! To stave it off, avoid sudden movement, stretch your hips and get some exercise. If you already have it, a mild heating pad, warm bath or some good ol’ Tylenol (acetaminophen) may help. (Avoid ibuprofen, a.k.a. Motrin or Advil, during pregnancy.)
  • Varicose veins: Pressure from your increased blood volume may enlarge veins, especially in your legs. Switching positions often when sitting or standing, not crossing your legs, avoiding high heels, getting plenty of exercise, avoiding too much salt and drinking plenty of water can help prevent varicose veins.
  • Colds & flus: Your immune system is a bit weaker now, so if you do get sick, allow yourself time to rest, and drink lots of fluids. For colds, medication-free treatments such as running a humidifier, wearing nasal strips and gargling with salt water are OK. But check with your doctor before taking any meds, including OTC and homeopathic ones. If you have a fever that’s 102 degrees Fahrenheit or higher or if you have any other concerning symptoms, see your doc.
  • Exercise: If you’re starting to feel more energetic, consider adding exercise to your daily routine. It can reduce pregnancy side effects and symptoms, increase energy, prevent gestational diabetes, improve mood, help you sleep and maybe even make childbirth easier. The best kind of exercise? Whatever you’ll enjoy doing, as long as doesn’t carry an injury risk.

Are you 14 weeks pregnant with no symptoms? Just consider yourself lucky and know that you’re just as pregnant as those women with the worst symptoms! Every body (and every baby!) is unique.

Fun Fact

The longest pregnancy on record was 375 days. Yep, that’s more than a year! Time magazine broke the story in 1945.

Your Life at 14 Weeks Pregnant

Now that you’re into the second trimester, hopefully, now you can spend more time enjoying being pregnant and less time being queasy.

  • Celebrate you: You made it to the second trimester. Rejoice! If you’re up for it, honor the occasion with a meal out. Or, indulge in your favorite treat from the comfort of your couch. Whatever you do, make it celebratory.
  • Good gear: If you don’t already own ultra-comfy walking shoes, now’s a good time to invest in a cute pair. Choose a slip-on option and your third trimester self will thank you. Sketcher’s Ultra Flex-Harmonious line are good choice for day-to-day running around.
  • Maternity leave prep: After you’ve shared your big news with work, it’s a good idea to start preparing for your leave. Not only will it bring you peace of mind, but it’ll also make you an office hero. Come up with a list of all your tasks and divide them into two categories: those you can complete before you leave and ongoing or long-term projects that need to be handed off to someone else. Once you have the latter, start compiling notes, best practices and other documentation to ease the transition.
  • Helpful hint: It may sound counterintuitive, but apple cider vinegar can actually relieve heartburn. If you’ve had little luck with antacids, try drinking a little apple cider vinegar mixed in a glass of water before meals to curb the burn. Start with a teaspoon and work your way up to a tablespoon. (Just check with your healthcare provider to make sure it’s safe for you.)

Your 14 Weeks Pregnant Belly

You’ll put on more weight from here on out. Depending on your body mass index (BMI), you’re probably recommended to gain about a pound per week all through the second and third trimesters. Ask your healthcare provider to be sure, since there are other factors involved, including how many pounds you gained (or lost!) in the first trimester, or if you’re pregnant with twins.

14 Week Baby Bumps from Real Moms


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14 Weeks Pregnant Checklist

  • Make a gym date with a friend.
  • Buy a good pair of sneakers with plenty of arch support to help keep you on the move during the last two trimesters.
  • Start preparing for maternity leave by listing all your work duties, so they can be completed by others while you’re gone.
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