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Best Scooters for Toddlers
Updated on
December 6, 2023

Best Scooters for Toddlers

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Best Scooters for Toddlers.
Best Scooters for Toddlers

For a long time, the only way your baby was getting from point A to point B was if you pushed, pulled or carried them there. But now you have a toddler on your hands, and things are about to change—and your tired arms and sore back are about to thank you.

A scooter is a fun, safe and efficient way for your toddler to get around, whether they’re zipping across your driveway, tackling a winding park path or rolling down a city street on a quick trip to the grocery store. And scooters are a lot more than just fun. They help build coordination and improve gross motor skills, burn off that seemingly endless supply of toddler energy and help your little one practice one of their favorite things: independence.

Types of Scooters for Toddlers

There are two categories of scooters: three-wheel and two-wheel scooters.

  • Three-wheel scooters have two wheels up front and one in the back. The three-wheel design makes balancing and steering easier, making these types of scooters a good choice for toddlers who just learning to scoot.
  • Two-wheel scooters have one wheel in the front and one in the back. They require more skill and coordination to operate than three-wheel scooters because the rider needs to be able to balance on two wheels.

Most toddlers learning to scoot for the first time will find three-wheel scooters much easier than those with just two wheels. However, there’s no set rule or recommendation around which type of scooter is best. If your little one has strong balance and coordination, they may be fine on a two-wheel scooter.

Toddler Scooter Features

You’ll want to consider these features when you’re shopping for a toddler scooter:

  • A smooth ride. For a scooter to tackle uneven terrain (think bumps in the sidewalk, tiny pebbles and more) it needs to have tough, durable wheels. Stay away from plastic and look for a scooter with strong wheels that provide stability as your toddler learns to ride. Keep in mind that larger wheels are more stable than smaller wheels and will help the scooter go faster.
  • A wide foot deck. A scooter’s deck—the spot where your toddler plants their feet while riding—should be wide, stable and feature some sort of grip or treads. This will help keep your toddler both comfortable and safe.
  • Steering and maneuverability. A scooter that’s easy to operate is a must for a toddler who’s newly on the move. Some toddler scooters feature a learn-to-steer, straight-across-style handlebar that turns the scooter as your child shifts their weight from side to side, while others feature a bicycle-style handlebar that turns. Regardless of steering type, look for a wide handlebar that’s easy to grip. If you want a scooter with a footbrake, be sure it’s easy enough for a toddler to apply.
  • Longevity. You’ll want a scooter that’s going to keep up with your fast-growing toddler. Look for one with a height-adjustable handlebar and a higher weight limit so they’ll be able to use it for years.
  • Portability. There are two things to consider in stroller portability: foldability and weight. While a folding scooter isn’t a must for some families, it’s an important feature if you know you’ll be regularly hauling around your scooter or storing it under your stroller when you’re on the go. Weight is also important; a scooter that’s too heavy is no fun for anyone. Look for a scooter with a lightweight frame that’s made from materials like carbon or aluminum.

Toddler Scooter Safety

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), anyone riding a scooter should wear protective gear—most importantly a helmet—at all times while scooting. Be sure the helmet you choose fits your child properly. You’ll also want to keep these other recommended safety tips from the AAP in mind:

  • Most scooter injuries happen from a fall. If your child seems unsteady at first, have them practice scooting on grass or another soft surface before heading out onto the pavement.
  • Never let your child ride their scooter in or near moving traffic.
  • Closely supervise your tiny scooter at all times. Never let your toddler (or any child under around eight years old) ride alone.

Babylist’s Best Toddler Scooter Picks

Best Toddler Scooter

What Our Experts Say

If you’re wondering what more you could ask for in a toddler scooter, stop now, because this one is about as good as it gets. Micro’s Mini Deluxe Scooter checks all the boxes and then some for the best toddler scooter. The frame is lightweight at just under four pounds yet sturdy enough to hold riders up to 75 pounds. The lean-to-steer turning is intuitive and effortless, and the handlebar is adjustable to grow with your little one. And the ride is super smooth; the strong wheels on the Micro Deluxe easily tackle all types of terrain.

What’s Worth Considering

Looking for a more portable option? The Micro Kickboard Mini Deluxe Foldable features a fold-down steering column for easy portability. Want to add lights? Check out the LED version.

Additional Specs
Scooter Weight 4 lbs
Adjustable Handlebar Yes
Age and Weight Recommendations 2-5 years, up to 75 lbs

Another Popular Choice

What Our Experts Say

One of the most challenging parts of learning to ride a scooter is mastering balance. This scooter helps out with its unique design; the steering column is curved, making it easier for your little one to balance. Other features worth a note are the wide rear polyurethane wheel, a grippy foot deck, a lightweight aluminum frame and lean-to-turn steering.

What’s Worth Considering

The handlebar on the Kids Cruze isn’t adjustable and the weight limit is far lower than the Micro Mini Deluxe. This scooter doesn’t fold so it’s not as easy to store or take on the go.

Additional Specs
Scooter Weight 6.1 lbs
Adjustable Handlebar No
Age and Weight Recommendations 2-5 years, up to 44 lbs

Best Affordable Toddler Scooter

What Our Experts Say

If your toddler wants to ditch their Radio Flyer wagon for a scooter, they’re in luck. The brand’s My 1st Scooter is well-priced and a good choice if you’re unsure your toddler will take to scooting and don’t want to spend a lot of money. The handlebars on this scooter steer it similar to a bike, but with a reduced turning radius to help your little one balance and steer. There’s also a textured, wide footbed and wheels that are low to the ground.

What’s Worth Considering

There are some downsides to this scooter. Like many other lower-priced scooters, this one doesn’t have an adjustable handlebar or a foot brake. The frame isn’t as durable as some higher-priced scooters and you can’t fold it down. And the wheels are plastic, which is its biggest drawback. But, if you don’t want to spend a lot of money, are looking for a scooter that will mostly be used on smooth surfaces (think inside the house or in a garage) or simply aren’t sure if your toddler will like scooting, we still think it’s a good choice.

Additional Specs
Scooter Weight 5 lbs
Adjustable Handlebar No
Age and Weight Recommendations 2-5 years, up to 50 lbs

Best Toddler Scooter with Seat

What Our Experts Say

A ride-on toy and a scooter come together in this hybrid design that features a removable fold-down seat. Why add a seat to a scooter? It mimics a tricycle and makes it even easier for younger toddlers to learn to ride. Once your little one gets the hang of scooting, either fold the seat up or remove it completely. The ScootKid also has a ton of other useful features like an adjustable handlebar, a thick, nonslip foot deck, a rear brake, durable polyurethane wheels and an extremely high weight limit. And the wheels light up!

What’s Worth Considering

The ScootKid is quite a bit heavier than most scooters on our list and it doesn’t fold, so it’s not a great choice if you’re looking for a portable scooting solution. The frame is made of plastic so it won’t be as durable as a toddler scooter with a carbon or aluminum frame. It does have one of the lowest age requirements of all the scooters on our list, though—toddlers one year and older can safely ride.

Additional Specs
Scooter Weight 9 lbs
Adjustable Handlebar Yes
Age and Weight Recommendations 1 year up to 132 lbs

Another Seated Option

What Our Experts Say

Another seated option, the LaScoota also features a removable seat for younger children who are just getting comfortable with riding on their own. The large, durable wheels offer a smooth ride (and light up, no batteries required) and the handlebar adjusts up and down to grow with your toddler. This scooter is a lean-to-steer style and also has a large, grippy deck and supports kids up to 110 pounds.

What’s Worth Considering

This toddler scooter is also on the heavier side, but isn’t the heaviest of the seated scooters on our list. It doesn’t fold. It also comes in a huge assortment of colors so your toddler can choose their favorite.

Additional Specs
Scooter Weight 7.7 lbs
Adjustable Handlebar No
Age and Weight Recommendations 2-5 years, up to 75 lbs

Most Versatile Toddler Scooter

What Our Experts Say

Can’t decide what you think your toddler might like? Want to replace five different riding toys with just one? (Yes, please.) Larktale’s Scoobi is a convertible scooter that adapts as your little one grows. There are five different modes: a tricycle, a balance bike, a ride-on, a three-wheel scooter and finally a two-wheel scooter. Parents rave about the smooth ride and how easy it is to transform it into different modes.

What’s Worth Considering

This scooter is the heaviest on our list, weighing just over 11 pounds. That’s a lot for a toddler scooter, but not a lot if you’re comparing it to a trike or a balance bike, so keep that in mind.

Additional Specs
Scooter Weight 11.2 lbs
Adjustable Handlebar Yes
Age and Weight Recommendations 2-5 years, up to 35 lbs

Another Convertible Option

What Our Experts Say

This sporty toddler scooter doesn’t have quite has many configurations as the Larktale, but it does feature three riding modes that are easy to access with the click of a button. The standout feature here is the push mode. The handlebar moves to the back, so you can help your child by pushing them along as they learn. There’s also a seated scooting mode and a standard three-wheel configuration. The handlebar adjusts to three different positions and the seat has two height options so it’s easy to find a custom fit. This toddler scooter also features light-up wheels.

What’s Worth Considering

The Go Up has lean-to-steer turning, but some parents complain that it’s not the easiest.

Additional Specs
Scooter Weight 4 lbs
Adjustable Handlebar Yes
Age and Weight Recommendations 2-5 years, up to 75 lbs

Best Toddler Scooter with Lights

What Our Experts Say

In the market for some scooter bling? Look no further than the Jetson Jupiter Mini. This three-wheel toddler scooter boasts over 100 multicolor lights on all three wheels and up and down the steering column. It’s a lot more than just sparkle, though. It’s foldable, so it’s a great portable scooter option, and there’s an adjustable handlebar. There’s also a rear brake, wide foot deck and a lightweight aluminum frame.

What’s Worth Considering

Jetson also makes a line of Disney-themed toddler scooters including Disney Princess, Grogu, Encanto and more.

Additional Specs
Scooter Weight 7 lbs
Adjustable Handlebar Yes
Age and Weight Recommendations 3 years up to 132 lbs

Jen LaBracio

Senior Gear Editor

Jen LaBracio is Babylist’s Senior Gear Editor, a role that perfectly combines her love of all things baby gear with her love of (obsessive) research. When she’s not testing out a new high chair or pushing the latest stroller model around her neighborhood, she likes to run, spin, listen to podcasts, read and spend time at the beach. In her past life, she worked for over a decade in children’s publishing. She lives outside of Chicago with her husband and their two boys, Will and Ben.

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